Sep
13
2012

Robin’s Journal: Week 11. Part 3

Posted by: Sherrie in Categories: Uncategorized.
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Robin, you got a decent amount of exercise in this past week despite your arthritis pain. Of course, one thing you need to be careful of with dog walking is the start-stop pattern that occurs with a dog that likes to sniff around a lot! I know that’s the case with my dog. In order for you to get a true cardio workout, you need to elevate your heart rate and keep it elevated throughout the duration of your session. Read the entire post…

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Jul
31
2012

Launching your Project

Posted by: Sherrie in Categories: Uncategorized.
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Your next step is to contact the corporations and businesses that you will approach with your project. A simple letter of introduction for small companies is fine. For larger corporations where a CEO or director of human resources will be involved, a more comprehensive, professional-looking presentation is essential. The package should highlight some of the information from the Surgeon General’s report. Read the entire post…

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Jun
27
2012

“Schizophrenia is not hard to diagnose in adults,” says McKenna. “It’s more difficult to diagnose in children because the symptoms are harder to distinguish. They can often masquerade as developmental problems or other disorders. Children may suffer more severely with schizophrenia if they have an early onset. Read the entire post…

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Apr
20
2012

Once testing has been performed, ask your physician to go over your blood tests with you so you can get some idea of whether your thyroid is mildly or more severely overactive. Also, ask if your physician is sure you have Graves’ disease, or could you have some other form of hyperthyroidism.
Some forms of hyperthyroidism last only a few weeks, and then they get better by themselves. These do not require treatment with antithyroid drugs, radioactive iodine, or surgery, though beta-blockers are often helpful.

Remember that you have the final say about your treatment. If you are considering medications and your physician recommends PTU, ask about taking methimazole. It is just as effective as PTU, and you can usually take half the number of pills every day.

For example, taking three tablets (10 milligrams each) of methimazole each morning is equivalent to taking two tablets (50 milligrams each) of PTU three times each day. Neither medication is very expensive.

If you are considering surgery, be sure that you are referred to a surgeon who is experienced in performing thyroidectomies and who continues to do them frequently. When you talk to the surgeon, ask whether many of his or her patients have had problems after surgery with hoarseness or low calcium levels. It is also important that the anesthesiologist who puts you to sleep for surgery has had experience working with hyperthyroid patients.

Many primary care physicians do a good job of caring for patients with Graves’ disease. However, if your questions are not being answered to your satisfaction, or if you feel as though you are not making progress with your therapy, then ask for a second opinion from a physician who specializes in treating thyroid problems and other hormonal conditions.

Such specialists are called endocrinologists. Referrals to an endocrinologist and an eye specialist (ophthalmologist) are also important if you have Graves’ eye disease.

If you have severe eye disease that may require surgery, then you will need to see an ophthalmologist who specializes in the treatment of Graves’ eye disease. Most ophthalmologists do not have experience with this type of surgery.

On rare occasions when a patient’s vision is threatened, such a referral needs to be made on an urgent basis.

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Aug
15
2011

Gov. George W. Bush has been running television ads in a number of primary states saying that he is “A Reformer With Results.”

One of the results he points to is that, “Under Governor Bush, Texas enacted some of the most comprehensive patient protection laws in the nation.”

Read the entire post…

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Jun
10
2010

A progressive Arabian doctor is punished, flagellate whip themselves, and suicides are disgraced in the annals of psychiatric absurdity.

FROM THE ANNALS OF PSYCHIATRIC ABSURDITY

Rhazes the Arabian Doctor

From A.D. 865 to 925, Rhazes was an Arabian doctor who was considered to be and outstanding scholar of the times. He wrote over 200 different volumes on medicine, religion, philosophy, and astronomy. As he rose to prominence, he became physician-in-chief to the Baghdad Hospital, which was a remarkble institution of its time, because it had a ward exclusively for the mentally ill. Rhazes saw the body/mind connection with mental illness and even used a primitive form of psychotherapy. However, the Arabian doctor ran afoul of the other influential doctors who believed that all illness was the result of demon activity. Since Rhazes disagreed with the medical establishment he was sentenced “to be hit over the head with his own book, until the book or the head broke.” This early psychiatrist was rendered blind after this punishment. ( Taken from The History of Psychiatry by Franz. G. Alexander and Sheldon T. Sel;esnick) Read the entire post…

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Dec
10
2009

Canadian radiologist presents findings to the Radiological Society of North America

“The radiologist wants a follow-up mammogram in six months,” your doctor tells you.

You’ve heard and seen all the TV and Radio ads about 1 in 8 women getting breast cancer. So, you’ve been good–you got screened. Now you have to do it all over again? Read the entire post…

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Oct
20
2009

The Budding Romance

During the initial stages of a romance, e-mail becomes both a blessing and a curse. E-mail flirtations increase in frequency, and the infatuated recipient can mull incessantly over every abbreviation and bit of punctuation. Phraseology can prompt tortured late-night conversations with empathetic friends, analyzing the minutiae of flirtatious e-mail etiquette. When he opened his note with the line “Hey there cutie” did it mean anything special—or is he just a player? Read the entire post…

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Oct
05
2009

Email E-Motions. Post 1

Posted by: Sherrie in Categories: Uncategorized.
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hey cutiepie, whats up? it was nice meeting you at the SAE party last night. wanna grab lunch ‘bout 12:30 or so? =) see you later. -chris

The art of the letter may be dead, but any college student will assure you that the art of the e-mail is alive and well. For college students, the importance of e-mail extends beyond its ability to request eleventh-hour paper extensions from professors or send quick notes to friends. E-mail has changed the way we look at romantic relationships. Read the entire post…

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May
25
2009

Hair loss treatments

Posted by: Sherrie in Categories: Uncategorized.
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While no one enjoys it, we all get older. As we get older, most of us gain some weight, tire more easily, and feel aches and pains we never had before. However, by doing beneficial things such as exercising and eating healthier, we can lessen some of the adverse effects of aging. Looking older and hair loss is one of the worst parts about aging. Hair loss is more common in men, and can affect a man’s self esteem. There are quite a few products available today, some prescription and some non prescription, which claim to reverse hair loss. One prescription medication that has shown some results is finasteride.

As stated on Wikipedia, Finasteride is a synthetic antiandrogen (it blocks the biological reactions of sex hormones of the male). Finasteride, sold under the name of Proscar, Fincar, and Finara, was originally meant as a treatment for men with benign prostate hyperplasia, as a 5 mg dose alleviates urinary symptoms. Finasteride has also been proven to help with hair loss in men. By taking a 1 milligram dose, finasteride (or Propecia) might reverse male pattern baldness.

When taken orally, a 1 mg dose of finasteride blocks production of the enzyme that converts testosterone to dihydrotestosterone, a hormone that causes shrinkage of hair follicles (Wellness Letter, University CA Berkeley). In clinical trials, it has been demonstrated that finasteride encourages hair to enter its active growth phase, reverses shrinkage of hair follicles, and slows hair loss. Propecia works best in men who are just starting to lose their hair and are not entirely bald. It also works better on hair loss that occurs around the crown rather than with receding hairlines. A visible difference will appear in about six months, so patience is needed, and by two years most of the hair growth has taken place. If you want to continue to keep your new hair, you will have to take this drug indefinitely. As well, this drug is effective only if your baldness is caused by androgenic alopecia (male pattern hair depletion). Read the entire post…

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