Jun
11
2012

Between one million and two million people in North America, and perhaps millions worldwide, have inflammatory bowel disease, or IBD.

This chronic inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract affects a wide, varied population with a similarly wide range of symptoms such as chronic abdominal pain, diarrhea, rectal bleeding, fever and weight loss. Some people with IBD experience relatively good health alternating with periods of flare-ups of the disease. Read the entire post…

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Jun
01
2012

The inflammation and destruction of the small intestine that occurs in Crohn’s disease can lead to other complications:
Nutritional problems — Inflammation throughout the small intestine may inhibit the body’s ability to absorb food and nutrients. Children with Crohn’s disease often suffer from growth retardation, and in some cases this may be the main symptom. Read the entire post…

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May
23
2012

Skin cancers have very minimal, if any symptoms. Itching of a pigmented spot may be a symptom of the development of malignant melanoma. Basal cell cancers and squamous cell cancers are usually asymptomatic but alert you to their presence by growth, crusting or roughness. Read the entire post…

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May
02
2012

Side effects from chemotherapy can vary from person to person, and depend on the drugs given and the doses received. While receiving chemotherapy, some patients may get infections, have less energy, lose their hair and experience a loss of appetite, nausea or vomiting. The doctor may prescribe medications to help ease these side effects, which go away after treatment is over. Read the entire post…

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Apr
28
2012

Physical Effects of Cervical Cancer
Patients who have cervical cancer usually have little or no physical effects in the early stages. As the disease progresses, however, there may be sufficient growth in the pelvis to cause problems with bowel movements because of pressure on the rectum; problems with urination because of similar pressure on the bladder; and sexual difficulties because of the growth in the upper vagina, limiting or causing discomfort with sex.

As the disease becomes more advanced, growth toward the sidewalls of the pelvis may cause the cancer to partially or completely block the ureters. Complete ureter blockage can lead to death because of uremia (the inability of the body to excrete waste), which causes uremic poisoning. This is relatively rare in developed countries because of widespread healthcare, but is not uncommon in undeveloped countries.

Because the uremic poisoning symptoms, such as nausea, fatigue, sleepiness and eventually coma, are similar to other major illnesses, this condition may be seen as just a sign of old age. Sometimes these patients do not even receive a simple pelvic exam, which could save their lives.

The physical effects of cervical cancer after treatment may be more remarkable. Patients who have a LEEP or conization procedure may experience cramping, bleeding or a watery discharge. After a hysterectomy, the woman may experience pain in her lower abdomen for a few days after the operation. Women may also have difficulty emptying their bladder for a few days and trouble having normal bowel movements. However, normal activities, including sexual intercourse, can usually be resumed in six to eight weeks.

Patients who have radiation therapy, which is usually reserved for more advanced stages, can experience sexual dysfunction, as the vagina may become shorter, more narrow and less flexible. They may also experience difficulty with urination because of the radiation shrinking the bladder and the loss of overall bladder tone. Difficulty with bowel movements may result because radiation can cause the rectum to change size. Some of the more serious radiation side effects may include bleeding from the rectum and bladder, as well as blockage of the intestines and prolonged diarrhea.

Radiation therapy also tends to make patients feel very tired, especially in the latter weeks of treatment. It is common for patients to lose hair — but only in the treated area — and for their skin to become dry, reddish and itchy.

Some patients who are treated with a combination of surgery and radiation can have lower extremity swelling, or edema, which can be disabling, but rarely life-threatening. Also, there may be some changes in sexual function if the cervix is surgically removed or changed due to radiation.

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Apr
04
2012

It is important to have a healthcare provider who is knowledgeable about the disease.

Providers who stay informed about the latest developments are more likely to use the most current treatments to better manage their patients and help them avoid complications. Read the entire post…

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Mar
05
2012

Identifying Acute Bronchitis

Posted by: Sherrie in Categories: Conditions and Diseases.
Using Tags: , ,

This is the time of year when bronchial health is tested. Any number of conditions may cause bronchial problems, including acute bronchitis.

Most people have an episode of acute bronchitis at some point in their lives — usually when a virus that causes a cold or throat infection spreads to the airway. The inflamed branches of the windpipe become swollen, leading to increased mucus production. The mucus clogs the airway and causes the heavy cough characteristic of bronchitis. Acute bronchitis can also be brought on by irritants such as cigarette smoke, chemical fumes or dust. Read the entire post…

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Feb
14
2012

What Are the Risks Associated With Pesticides?
The legitimate concern of keeping the West Nile virus in check has been overshadowed this summer by misguided fears of the control measure: pesticides. Members of the media, inspired by the New York City Health Commissioner, are exacerbating the hype, telling people to seal up their windows and turn off their air conditioning, describing pesticide-spraying trucks in terms of horror films. Read the entire post…

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Feb
14
2012

The recent spraying of New York City’s Central Park with the pesticide Anvil has sparked a nationwide debate. Vital information, such as the risks the West Nile virus presents and the benefits spraying the pesticide confers, is notably missing from this debate. In its place, the public is being presented with hype, unscientific reports and a good old-fashioned fear campaign against pesticides. Read the entire post…

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Feb
06
2012

Too few Americans who have heart disease take aspirin to help prevent a second heart attack, according to a report in the March 14 issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

While the American Heart Association and other medical groups recommend aspirin therapy for people who have suffered a heart attack, the report revealed that only 26 percent actually received aspirin.

Read the entire post…

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